Mar 042013
 
Carex, ivy and silver birch in a pot

Lambeth

The walk from Lambeth North tube to the Garden Museum isn’t the most scenic (it’s better to walk from Westminster, and enjoy the view of the river and Houses of Parliament on the way), but I like it.

If you go via the Imperial War Museum, there are some interesting town houses (some with nice gardens) to nosey at. If you take the short cut, you walk through an industrial estate that has some unusual-looking businesses. Whichever way you go, you walk past a cafe that always looks horrible and an industrial bakers that always smells amazing. And then you end up at the Garden Museum, a haven for garden lovers in the midst of thundering traffic.

Last week I took the industrial estate route, and saw these pots: a grass (carex), ivy (its stems growing upwards) and multi-stemmed silver birch. There are quite a few of them, outside what I think is a design studio. A nice bit of permanent, low maintenance but high-impact planting, don’t you think?

Enhanced by Zemanta
Jan 212012
 

 

Staffordshire

Ever since I set myself the challenge of only featuring winter pots that don’t feature all the usual suspects such as ivy, skimmias, pansies, cyclamen and so on, output on this blog has dropped dramatically. So it’s just as well that I came across these winter containers at John Massey’s garden.

John isn’t a fan of pansies as they often get mildew, so he prefers to use other plants. In these pots, he’s got a few winter stalwarts such as skimmias, carex and ivy, but to them he’s added flotsam and jetsam from around the garden: seed heads of grasses and perennials, leaves, berries and pine cones. It’s a technique that florists use all the time, and one I’m definitely going to adopt.